Egg Nog and Punch recipes

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Egg Nog and Punch recipes

Unread postby bourbonv » Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:13 pm

I thought I would copy the Old Fitzgerald recipes for egg nog and holiday punch from the library to recipes. Gary was interested in a punch recipe.

Old Fitzgerald Egg Nog
1 doz. eggs, seperated
1 1/2 pints Old Fitzgerald
12 T. sugar
1 pt. heavy cream, whipped
1 pt. heavy cream unwhipped
Cinnamon or nutmeg

Stir egg yolks with sugar until smooth; slowly drip on pint of Old Fitzerald Bourbon into egg mixture, stirring constantly, then stir in unwhipped cream. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites, then stir in extra 1/2 pint of Old Fitzgerald. Chill untill serving time, then fold in the pint of whipped cream. Sprinkle with cinnamon or nutmeg. Makes 12 servings.

Flaming Punch
3 Oranges
1 T. Maple Syrup
Whole Cloves
1 t. nutmeg
1 fifth Old Fitzgerald
1 t. ground sugar
2 bottles of red wine
1 t. cinnamon
1 t. bitters

Stud Oranges with cloves and roast at 350 degrees until oranges are soft to touch. Cut Oranges in quarters, place in heat proof bowl or chafing dish; cover with Old Fitzgerald Bourbon; add all other ingredients and heat, but do not boil, until steam begins to rise Keep hot until ready to serve, then flame. Makes about 25 servings.
Mike Veach
"Our people live almost exclusively on whiskey" - E H Taylor, Jr. 25 April 1873
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Unread postby gillmang » Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:51 pm

Mike, thanks so much for that! Both are very interesting, especially the combination of red wine and whiskey in the punch (I don't think I've ever seen that before).

The next time we can get together, I intend to make one of these.

This may be sooner than later, at one of Doug's upcoming study group sessions. January is not feasible for me but if there is one in February, I'm coming.

Gary
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Unread postby bourbonv » Sun Dec 16, 2007 3:10 pm

The punch should be good on a cold February day. I am looking forward to it.
Mike Veach
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Unread postby gillmang » Sun Dec 16, 2007 3:51 pm

Indeed!

By the way Mike, I was just reading on a bottle collecting site some of its newsletter articles and one of them is an interesting piece on Irvin Cobb. One of the things stated is that he had a column in the Louisville Evening News around 1900 called Kentucky Sour Mash, which was very popular and provided the groundwork for his later journalism and writing career in New York. I wonder if those articles could be found today. Could this be an early whiskey version of the modern wine columns in newspapers and other press? At a minimum it sounds quite interesting.

Gary
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Unread postby brendaj » Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:24 pm

Gary,
I'm with you. I'd like to read a few of those columns myself. I like Cobb. I would be willing to try to pull them from someone's microfiche if I knew where to look. Just not sure who's holding the old Louisville Evening News. All I remember is the Louisville Times. Gee, wouldn't it be cool if it was at the Filson Club? ... :P

I talked with Mike, and he reminded me of this older post. Here's the thread in the library with the rest of those cool recipes.
http://www.bourbonenthusiast.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2738
Check out the Fitzgerald Pecan Cake...
As a Kentuckian, I consider it my civic duty to drink Bourbon, smoke and bet the ponies. Its a tuff job, but someone has to do it...
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Unread postby barturtle » Tue Dec 18, 2007 5:09 pm

According to Wikipedia and KYLIT, he actually worked for the Louisville Evening Post. The Louisville Free Public Library shows an Evening Post on microfilm from 1878-1925. If this is the right Evening Post, there you have a place to look.
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Unread postby gillmang » Tue Dec 18, 2007 5:40 pm

Thanks Brenda, and Timothy, and you're right it must be the Evening Post not Evening News.

Those recipes and concoctions are all interesting. One thing I note in prewar recipes is their relative complexity. People seemed to like complex mixtures of things, both in food (often) and drink.

Gary
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Unread postby brendaj » Wed Dec 19, 2007 11:51 am

Ok Tim, ya got me... :lol: I'll be willing to drop by the library and see what they have. I'm interested in seeing his column too.

Gary,
One thing I note in prewar recipes is their relative complexity. People seemed to like complex mixtures of things, both in food (often) and drink.

Honestly, I believe that was more a necessity than a desire. If men desired complexity that may have been more a flourish of bartending skills...sort of 'chest thumping with a jigger'... :wink:
But I believe women had little choice. Prewar foods were different. Far fewer things were pre-packaged-meal-in-a-box-make-it-in-5 minutes, so women were forced to use individual ingredients. And, the thought of spending time preparing things wasn't so unbelievable to them. If you wanted beef broth, you boiled bones for hours. Today, we're far too busy for such nonsense... :roll:
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Unread postby gillmang » Wed Dec 19, 2007 12:42 pm

Well, that's true, necessity probably was a cause in cooking anyway, probably to get a good taste they did this, when as you say today, a stuffing, say, can be pulled from a box (even though not half as good as homemade). Also, people would have to make do often with less expensive cuts which required longer and more imaginative cooking than say a chop.

Take something like devilled sandwiches, who makes that today? It requires chicken or other meats finely minced with flavourings and spices, takes time to prepare, but it was done to get a good taste. Burgoo same, many ingredients, long cooking.

Maybe all home cooking really falls into this category and that is the change mentioned, that people don't cook in the same way at home anymore, just too much time and trouble.

As for drinks, what happened to the old punches..? All disappeared mostly. Some egg nog tradition survives because of Christmas. But the old punches, cups, flips, most cocktails except the simplest kinds, all seemingly in the past.

Gary
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Unread postby Bucc58 » Wed Dec 19, 2007 7:28 pm

Adolf Hitler killed the traditional American kitchen. What a shame! :evil:
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Unread postby cowdery » Wed Dec 19, 2007 9:47 pm

I know Cobb from his novels, especially (and of course) Red Likker. Somehow, I never knew or even suspected that he had worked in Louisville. Now I see he was there only about 18 months.

Have you seen a picture of him? My kind of guy.

The Irvin Cobb revival starts here!
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Unread postby brendaj » Sat Dec 22, 2007 1:56 pm

Chuck,
Isn't Cobb the guy that said, "Once a Kentuckian, always a Kentuckian" ?
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