Breakfast Time!

Cookin' in the kitchen with bourbon & Brenda! Come on in and view her recipes or share with us some of your own.

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Breakfast Time!

Unread postby NeoTexan » Thu May 31, 2007 8:58 pm

JELLIED BOURBON
2/3 CUP bourbon
1 TBSP plain gelatin
1/3 CUP sugar
1 1/3 CUPS boiling water
1/3 CUP orange juice

Dissolve the gelatin in the bourbon. Pour into the boiling water, add the sugar and orange juice, stir well and pour into custard cups. Let it cool and put in fridge.

SIMPLE BUTTERMILK BISCUITS

I've tried a gazillion recipes for biscuits; yet, I always come back to this simple one.

2 cups Martha White self rising flour (no other flour will do)
1 stick salted butter (unsalted will work, but I'm a salthead)
about 3/4 cup buttermilk (don't skimp here and get some cheap off brand...more fat the better, too)

Preheat oven to 500. Cut the cold butter in small pieces and blend it in with the flour using the back of a fork or one of them fancy handheld pastry cutters. Mix in just enough buttermilk to make it all good and sticky. You can either do them as drop biscuits or cut outs. If you cut out, knead the dough 3 or 4 times and roll the dough out on a floured surface. Cut them with a cutter that has an open back in order not to squish all the air out of your dough. That means don't use a glass. If you don't have a biscuit cutter, you can use a clean tuna fish can that has both top and bottom removed (this'll make some big fat cat heads). Whatever you use, don't twist as you cut out so your sides will be nice and airy and not closed off. Place biscuits on ungreased baking sheet for 8-10 minutes. Don't forget to slather on some bourbon jelly!
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Unread postby bunghole » Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:21 am

Mmmmm! Biscuits and jelly fit for a saint! ima'd eat that!

:arrow: imasaintbunghole :angel7:
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Unread postby NeoTexan » Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:43 am

There are some here who have tasted this already. She who must be obeyed made some for a MM Mile Party at Ed and Patty's a few years ago.

Also as a serving suggestion, if you what to make gifts. Add a LITTLE food coloring to simulate boubon color. Pour into a bourbon glass style of your choosing (leave a litle room at the top), let set and cover the mixture top with parafin. I've even used plastic "ice cubes", available at my local hobby store, in a rocks glass, to add to the effect.
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Unread postby brendaj » Fri Jun 01, 2007 1:19 pm

There are some here who have tasted this already. She who must be obeyed made some for a MM Mile Party at Ed and Patty's a few years ago.

:lol: Very funny...and oddly empowering at the same time... :P I'm thinking maybe a shirt...

I must be honest, that recipe came from LeNell. Thanks for remembering. Its a good one, and makes a great ham glaze too!
Bj
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Unread postby NeoTexan » Fri Jun 01, 2007 2:42 pm

brendaj wrote:
There are some here who have tasted this already. She who must be obeyed made some for a MM Mile Party at Ed and Patty's a few years ago.

I must be honest, that recipe came from LeNell. Thanks for remembering. Its a good one, and makes a great ham glaze too!
Bj


Thanks for the correct provenance, I couldn't remember where we got it from. (Thank You LeNell :D )
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Unread postby bourbonv » Fri Jun 01, 2007 2:45 pm

Brenda,
The quote "She who must be obeyed" is from British TV - Rumple of the Bailey I think is the correct show. I am sure I have seen T-Shirts offered in magazines from PBS before. Search on ebay and I am sure you can get one if you can not find one through PBS.

The Oscar Getz sells a bourbon jelly but this sounds like it might be more flavorfull. I wonder how it would work as a finishing glaze on Chuck's pork.
Mike Veach
"Our people live almost exclusively on whiskey" - E H Taylor, Jr. 25 April 1873
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Unread postby NeoTexan » Fri Jun 01, 2007 4:31 pm

bourbonv wrote:Brenda,
I wonder how it would work as a finishing glaze on Chuck's pork.


I like your thinking!! I think I will try it on some smoked brisket I plan on doing this weekend.
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Unread postby brendaj » Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:54 pm

Dale,
I think I will try it on some smoked brisket I plan on doing this weekend.

Ya know, someone sent me this brisket rub some time ago. I've never used it because I had trouble thinking about brisket and sweet together. Your mention of the Bourbon jelly on a brisket sounded so dang good, it made me remember this rub. I've always hesitated to use sugar in any rub because it burns so easy, but I'll toss it out here anyway...

Brisket Brown Sugar Rub
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup salt (coarse salt works best)
1/3 cup paprika
1/3 cup chili powder (choose a hot or mild powder depending on your
tastes)
1/3 cup ground black pepper

Mix ingredients and pack firmly around brisket 12-24 hours before
smoking. Wrap in plastic wrap or place in a large plastic bag.




If you're going to try the jelly on brisket, I can't wait for your opinion. It really does sound wonderful...
Bj
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The last brisket I did turned out a little dry. Maybe you could give me a tip or two to help keep it moist.
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Unread postby NeoTexan » Sat Jun 02, 2007 12:28 am

brendaj wrote:I've always hesitated to use sugar in any rub because it burns so easy,
Bj


I'm with you on this. I do not use a rub and I do not serve it "wet". I try to let my Mesquite do the flavoring. (After i serve it, it someone wants a sause, I have it on the table)

As to suggestion ... I know some wonderful bbq cooks and know from tasting their work that I have a long way to go. But .... I do end up with a very moist product in the end.

I use a true smoker (see below), Natural Lump Charcoal (lit without "Scout Oil"), mesquite wood (half have been soaked in water overnight) and cook at 200-220 degrees until temp probe of the meat reads 160 (That is when the collagen starts to break down.) which is usually 5-7 hrs depending on weather factors. At that point I wrap in foil as to not lose those new juices and keep the meat at about 165 - 170 for about another hour.

The mesquite has been added about every 15 to 20 minutes all along the day to get the smoke going. Be careful, it burns hotter so use it only when the temp starts to drop.

It's a long day of watching a fire so bring a bottle of your favorite

I'll let you know how the jelly works though. I'm always up for experimentation. This weekend may not be best ... heavy rain coming.
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Unread postby Mike » Sat Jun 02, 2007 12:12 pm

NeoTexan wrote:
brendaj wrote:I've always hesitated to use sugar in any rub because it burns so easy,
Bj


I'm with you on this. I do not use a rub and I do not serve it "wet".
As to suggestion ... I know some wonderful bbq cooks and know from tasting their work that I have a long way to go. But .... I do end up with a very moist product in the end.


It's a long day of watching a fire so bring a bottle of your favorite



I am just what I would call an advanced amatuer too (just like I am an advanced amatuer bourbon lover), who has a great time of it and usually have what I do turn out well...............or maybe people are just being nice?

I agree about not putting sauce on meat while it is cooking, in my experience you just can't cook slow, slow with any sauce that has sugar in it. A thin bast like bourbon to help hold the moisture when you are cooking in the open works for me.

I also agree about letting the meat be the main thing.......being what I call 'true' to the meat. I think you should always be able to taste and enjoy the meat without any sauce on it (I always sneak a sample whilst cooking to make sure it is fittin). The sauce goes on last for me and sauce can only do so much to save poor tasting or dried out meat.

Lots of restaurants boil their ribs before grilling.......takes some of the best flavors out.......and then slathers them with sauce to hide the poor quality of their meat.
Do not go gentle into that good night,
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Rage, rage against the dying of the light. - Dylan Thomas
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Unread postby NeoTexan » Sat Jun 02, 2007 2:46 pm

Mike wrote:Lots of restaurants boil their ribs before grilling.......takes some of the best flavors out.......and then slathers them with sauce to hide the poor quality of their meat.


Amen brother .... preach it. :thumbleft: :thumbleft: :thumbleft:
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Unread postby Brendi » Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:06 pm

I use a true smoker (see below), Natural Lump Charcoal (lit without "Scout Oil"), mesquite wood (half have been soaked in water overnight) and cook at 200-220 degrees until temp probe of the meat reads 160 (That is when the collagen starts to break down.) which is usually 5-7 hrs depending on weather factors. At that point I wrap in foil as to not lose those new juices and keep the meat at about 165 - 170 for about another hour.
Yeah Buddy, now yer talkin'! Here in Kentucky, we use a bunch of hickory as a flavor wood. And, I use a cheaper version of your cooker, but same idea. One of the things I really like about the Chargriller, it has cast iron cooking grates. Mine are nice and seasoned, and they rock. I'm a major fan of cast iron!
Bj
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I know the yellow halo is overkill...this shot is off their website.
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Uncle Fred fell in a whiskey vat last week. Some men tried to pull him out, but he fought them off playfully and drowned. We had him cremated and he burned for three days...
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Unread postby Brendi » Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:35 pm

NeoTexan wrote:
Mike wrote:Lots of restaurants boil their ribs before grilling.......takes some of the best flavors out.......and then slathers them with sauce to hide the poor quality of their meat.


Amen brother .... preach it. :thumbleft: :thumbleft: :thumbleft:


Absolutely!!

I'm feelin' pretty guilty because I just had dinner at the little joint I recommended to Gary & Libby (I'm sorry folks) when they were intown for the Sampler. Bootleg BBQ used to do the real thing, and I caught 'em boiling for the second time! Unacceptable. I understand time constraints, and short-cuts in the kitchen. Just not in the meat if you're a BBQ joint... :bs:

You can tell by the way the meat pulls away from the bone. Those guys that brag about ribs that 'fall off the bone' don't impress me. You should have to tug at it gently (not more than gently though... :wink: )
Uncle Fred fell in a whiskey vat last week. Some men tried to pull him out, but he fought them off playfully and drowned. We had him cremated and he burned for three days...
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Unread postby gillmang » Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:39 pm

No worries Brenda, we ate the pulled meat sandwiches when we were there (pork, beef, mutton) and they were great!

I must say though that parboiling ribs makes sense to me. It can take some of the strong taste out, some meat gets that taste (I was told certain boars can impart the taste) plus the tenderness factor is certainly enhanced.

Of course, my rib knowledge is somewhat limited because I've only tried (by and large) commercial restaurant versions. I like Outback's though, to me that is very good, I don't know how the cognoscenti (or is that cognoscenta ?:)) rate them. :)

Gary
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