How you be cook them bourbeque ribs

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How you be cook them bourbeque ribs

Unread postby Mike » Thu May 31, 2007 3:16 pm

First you finds a place in yo neighbor's back yard that is nice and flat. Then you lays out a recktangle ('bout 4 feet by 7 feet) and put two courses of cinder block on three sides, leaving one of the 4 foot sides open. Then you gets two 25 lb bags of charcoal and you starts a far (hillbilly for fire) with the first bag..........making sure you enough away from yo neighbor's house so the far department don't need to get involved.

On toppa the cinder blocks you put a nice strong wire grate/grill on which you gone put near 'bout thutty pound of baby back ribbys (you can get good ones at Sam's or BJ's warehouse).

In yo han now you got a shovel and you gone shovel somma the charcoal from the far which you built a while back in under that grate and spread it out............no need to put all the charcoal, that'd make it too hot, hot on the ribbys.

Now that grate with them ribbys should be about 15 or so anches (inches) from the coals and when you open the flat of yo hand over that grill, you ort to be able to leave yo han over the grate/grill for near 'bout ten seconds before you have to take it away.

Recomember now, you want to cook these ribbys slow, slow. You gone turn them ribbys over about every haf hour. Be sure and don't leave them too long on the meaty side. This thutty pound should take near 'bout three hours, maybe a little less. If they seem to be cooking too fast, back off on the far a bit. You ain't in no hurry or you wouldn't be doing this cooking thisaway. That first 25 lb bag of charcoal gone last 'bout haf way, or a little more, through the cooking. You gots to shovel more charcoal under the grate/grill about every 15 to 20 minutes or so and check the heat with yo han so it stays jest right. At about 1 hour and 15 min into the cooking you might want to look into starting that nother 25 bag of charcoal. You ain't gone use alla that nother bag but one bag probably ain't quite enough. Try using haf to three fourths of that nother bag if you are a cheap soul.

Now whilst you managing the charcoal, the shovel, yo han, and them ribbys, you gone be sipping on some good bourbon. But, you got three hours to go when you start, so sip slow, slow, else you might disturb yo neighbor with yo singing. It goes bestest if one or three of yo drinking buddies is sipping along with you and when you get tired and hot, han them the shovel for a while..............you still gotta do the han checking though.

Got yo watch on? Good, cause you gone need it. Every 15 minutes you gone brush either some bourbon or some apple juice on them ribbys, alternating each one ater other. If you got some applewood chips you could just toss them on the charcoal for a little xtry smoke too also.

Now about two hours and a haf into this affair, if the far department ain't had to be summoned, and you ain't disturbed yo neighbour with yo singing, you can put the bourbon and apple juice away and pull out some Eyetalian Dressing (same as for salads) and spread somma that on the ribbys. You also gone also sprinkle a gracious plenty of seasoned salt and garlic powder on the ribbys too. You gone do this a time or two in that last haf hour.

Now you can take them ribbys, which will look and smell just beautiful, cut them up for yo guests (thutty pound will feed neigh on to thutty peeps and don't fergit the cole slaw and baked beans........give Mike Veach a few days notice so he can make you somma his bourbon baked beans) and be prepared for them to say they ain't never, never, had better ribbys, no way, no time, no how. Don't let them see the Pappy you been asipping, else they gone say they want a swig, and being as they guests, you obliged to give it 'em. If you have any lef, they freeze real good and you can take a few to work in yo lunch pail when you go back in the mine.

Make sure you give a couple of ribbys to yo neighbor and tell him you gone see to them cinder blocks and his yard sometime next week!
Last edited by Mike on Thu May 31, 2007 8:33 pm, edited 9 times in total.
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Unread postby gillmang » Thu May 31, 2007 3:21 pm

Mike, do they barbeque mutton in your part of the South? I ran into some outside Bardstown recently and liked it a lot, as mentioned before, I believe it is a survival of old English (or British, really) eating habits.

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Unread postby Mike » Thu May 31, 2007 3:27 pm

gillmang wrote:Mike, do they barbeque mutton in your part of the South? I ran into some outside Bardstown recently and liked it a lot, as mentioned before, I believe it is a survival of old English (or British, really) eating habits.

Gary


I have never had mutton, Gary. And lamb is not that popular in the South. Howsomever, I do a rack of lamb that is just outstanding (so I have been repeatedly told). I get the frenched New Zealand lamb at Sam's and make my own basting sauce and cook them on the grill just like you would a fine steak. And, in my opinion, they are better than the finest steak. A decent red wine (I don't know much about wine, but I find I like the Australian wines for the money).

Along with the lamb I usually have a fresh salad and some mashed potatoes...........not sparing of real butter in the potatoes.
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
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Unread postby gillmang » Thu May 31, 2007 7:14 pm

Sounds good Mike! But being familiar with barbeque, you might try the barbequed mutton of Kentucky (or lamb of course will work, say that New Zealand lamb, the shoulder would be good). It is long cooked and deboned, soft and melting and swathed in the same sauce (vinegary tomato sauce, not too hot) that you often see with pork or brisket in the South. I had mine piled up on a soft hamburger-type bun with beans and cold slaw on the side. Mighty good. Red wine wouldn't work, but cold, good beer, or iced whiskey (maybe with cola), now you're talking, Sire.

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Unread postby Mike » Thu May 31, 2007 7:27 pm

gillmang wrote:Sounds good Mike! But being familiar with barbeque, you might try the barbequed mutton of Kentucky (or lamb of course will work, say that New Zealand lamb, the shoulder would be good). It is long cooked and deboned, soft and melting and swathed in the same sauce (vinegary tomato sauce, not too hot) that you often see with pork or brisket in the South. I had mine piled up on a soft hamburger-type bun with beans and cold slaw on the side. Mighty good. Red wine wouldn't work, but cold, good beer, or iced whiskey (maybe with cola), now you're talking, Sire.

Gary


I also do butterflied leg of lamb that has been marinated for a couple of days in a wine/soy balsamic vinegar concoction (I usually add Port to my marinade) that I cook much like a thick steak.

I have never even seen mutton available hereabouts. Maybe I need to check Whole Foods. I understand that mutton is lamb writ large (and a little tougher)..............and I like the tanginess of lamb.......that extra something..........je ne sais quoi, that lamb has over steak.
Last edited by Mike on Thu May 31, 2007 8:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. - Dylan Thomas
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Unread postby Mike » Thu May 31, 2007 7:41 pm

gillmang wrote:Sounds good Mike! But being familiar with barbeque, you might try the barbequed mutton of Kentucky (or lamb of course will work, say that New Zealand lamb, the shoulder would be good). It is long cooked and deboned, soft and melting and swathed in the same sauce (vinegary tomato sauce, not too hot) that you often see with pork or brisket in the South. I had mine piled up on a soft hamburger-type bun with beans and cold slaw on the side. Mighty good. Red wine wouldn't work, but cold, good beer, or iced whiskey (maybe with cola), now you're talking, Sire.

Gary


By the way, Gary, if your travels ever take you to Atlanta, I would be most pleased to entertain you with a sip of your favorite (obtainable) bourbon and a lamb meal. I know we would enjoy a few hours company and you would also be most welcome to stay here and spend your savings on spirits to be had hereabouts. A sincere offer. You are a gentleman and an interesting fellow (the highest complement I bestow on people.........that they be interesting...........honesty and integrity taking a close but definite second, considering my own obvious deficiencies........but I only lie wihen it is necessary or convenient).
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. - Dylan Thomas
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Unread postby gillmang » Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:21 am

Thanks Mike, kind of you to suggest the idea! Maybe one day, I'd love to get down there again, the first and only time (in the Atlanta-area) was in the mid-1980's. I know you are getting to some of the bourbon events now and maybe we can meet up in Bardstown one day. Anyway your own approach to lamb cuisine sounds mighty good. By the way, I was reading up on barbeque again recently and apparently there is a barbacoa dish with lamb or mutton (mature lamb, yes) in Mexico. The word barbecue seems to derive from this word, barbacoa, which is appparently a new world, Indian-derived term (Arawak possibly, I think) that became part of Spanish. So its use with mutton and other meats in the American barbecue may not be a simple reflection of old English eating habits, or not directly as such.

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Unread postby bunghole » Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:24 am

PIG PICKIN' AT GEORGIA MIKE'S!
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Unread postby brendaj » Fri Jun 01, 2007 4:48 pm

Whoohoo! Now we're talkin'!
I'm going to love this!! The culinary art of meat, fire and time... My passion!

Mike, yer exactly right about the concrete block pit. They rock. Years ago, we used to have 'field parties'. Someone with a few hundred acres would put up a pit and a makeshift bandstand, haul a generator and a flat-bed wagon (for the side dishes) into the field, and the party would go the whole weekend long. Only difference, we did whole hog (like Linn's pig-pickin') cooked over barrel staves that had been burned to coals, and shoveled under the piggy. So damn good it would bring tears to your eyes...

I'm one of an original group of BBQ folks that have bounced around the internet in one forum or the other for about 10 years. They've done this sort of pit several different ways:
http://www.ibiblio.org/lineback/bbq/pits.htm
And down your way, Bob & Ginger are gearing up for their HTH Fest...
(and before you click on this link, these folks are purists, you'll see what I mean... :wink: )
http://bobinga.com/hth/hth.htm

And yes, Gary is exactly right when he says...western Kentucky is all about the mutton. And they have the International BBQ Festival thing going on. They even do a thing called 'Mutton Glutton'...which is pretty cute.
http://www.bbqfest.com/
And they have a BBQ Trail:
http://www.10000trails.com/BBQtrail/index.html
Sadly, their festival hits around Derby, and its damned-near impossible to do both.

But honestly, most of the rest of the state is all about the pig. There's some really excellent BBQ joints in the Bluegrass region. You'll find ribs, pulled pork and brisket that'll rival Memphis, Kansas City and Texas.

And speaking of Texas, I believe its time for Randy's Carnivore Carnival. Those guys are serious about cookin' some meat! Maybe he'll share share some photos, or a recipe or two.

In the meantime, here's a shot of Bill Tolbert's dressed up version of the concrete block pit. Pretty nice, huh?
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Unread postby gillmang » Sat Jun 02, 2007 7:49 am

Thanks Brenda for that, most interesting.

Reading on barbeque in Wikipedia, they state the word origin is probably that barbacoa was a Taino word. The Taino were an aboriginal people local to the Caribbean area before European settlement. They did open pit cooking of various animals and the Spanish used goats and lamb and pig and apparently the word came into various parts of the U.S. from Spanish and French areas that had absorbed the barbeque cooking method. The word I think too, or the cooking rather, is connected to the idea of a sauce, or sop or glaze. Because many parts of the world know cooking on an open or partly closed pit, it is an age-old and probably the original way most people cooked food. But most barbeque I think gets connected to the sauce idea. I don't know if the Taino used a sauce, this may have been an American innovation and maybe why the dish is so connected to America today. E.g., we like a Portuguese style of chicken which is barbequed but it is not really connected to an American barbeque, the chicken is cooked with dry seasonings and sauce can be added after (they use a small amount of a ginger-spiced tomato sauce for this, but on the side). As Dale said though, some beef and I know other meats are cooked dry (moistened only by its own juices), so both ways are done even in the States. Still, I think it is fair to say most people associate barbeque with a basted sauce. When I had the mutton at that place outside Bardstown Brenda recommended, it came swathed in a nice tomatoey sauce. But a person who worked there told me in Owensboro they cook it without sauce and a person can add it after, at the table.

One time driving in Nelson County I saw a sign off the road, "Jody's Party", and I asked about these parties on SB and was told about parties similar to what Brenda called field parties. But I always liked that name, "Jody's Party", it has an evocative sound, e.g. I think it would be a good name for a rock or country band, or for a novel about the South.

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Unread postby Bourbon HQ » Sat Jun 02, 2007 11:08 am



Yeah Gary, you're right. I spent three years in Puerto Rico and ate a lot of pig. The Taino Indians were native to PR.

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Re: How you be cook them bourbeque ribs

Unread postby 393foureyedfox » Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:12 pm

bbq 'sauce' is probably attributed to the americas as both the hot pepper and tomato are native to this part of the world
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