English beer - Ruddles

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English beer - Ruddles

Unread postby Brewer » Sun Apr 09, 2006 6:31 pm

Of the English brews that I've tasted, Ruddles is one of my favs. I also like Boddington's, Thomas Hardy's, Old Peculiar to name a few. Ruddles is more of an easy drinkin' brew, as opposed to TH or OP which to me can be quite intense. What are your favorite English brews?
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Unread postby gillmang » Sun Apr 09, 2006 7:12 pm

I like all the ones you mentioned Bob. I have had some of them (Boddington, Ruddle's County) on the handpump in Britain but the canned versions are almost as good (when freshly sold).

I like Fuller's 1845 which is bottle-conditioned and represents one type of fruity rich fresh-character English ale. Also, Fiddler's Elbow has a good English hop character. Black Sheep's beers (Yorkshire) are very good, too.

Of the many fine American microbrews, I tend to prefer those in an English style. Old Yard Ale and others by Yard in Philadelphia are examples; also, the ales from Geary in Maine, but there are many others including on the West Coast (e.g. Double Barrel Ale).

I like the American Pale Ale style too, but at its best the British-accented beers are hard to beat. I am sure some of the breweries on L.I. showcase some good examples.

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Unread postby Brewer » Mon Apr 10, 2006 5:45 pm

gillmang wrote: I have had some of them (Boddington, Ruddle's County) on the handpump in Britain but the canned versions are almost as good (when freshly sold).

I like Fuller's 1845 which is bottle-conditioned and represents one type of fruity rich fresh-character English ale. Also, Fiddler's Elbow has a good English hop character. Black Sheep's beers (Yorkshire) are very good, too.

Of the many fine American microbrews, I tend to prefer those in an English style. Old Yard Ale and others by Yard in Philadelphia are examples; also, the ales from Geary in Maine, but there are many others including on the West Coast (e.g. Double Barrel Ale).

I like the American Pale Ale style too, but at its best the British-accented beers are hard to beat. I am sure some of the breweries on L.I. showcase some good examples.Gary


Gary,

I'm envious...having Boddington's & Ruddles off a handpump in a British pub! :partyman: :urock: Damn, that's living! I had not seen Ruddles County in the can for a long time here on LI, but saw it again recently. It is a really fine brew, with a nice rocky head. I thought that they used to have one of those widget things that would make for a nice creamy head after you opened up the can. Was that your experience? My current cans don't have the widget, but still pours nicely. Fuller's 1845 is also a great British brew, I'd forgotten about that one, but I have not had the other British items which you mentioned.

I agree that there are a variety of micro-brews that replicate the style quite well, and I'd agree that Geary's and Old Yard Ale are 2 of them. Do you recall the Burton-style ale that I brought to the Festival a few years back? It was brewed at Southhampton brewery and was a wonderful version of that style, made even better as it was soooo fresh. Great stuff! :beer:
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Unread postby gillmang » Mon Apr 10, 2006 8:18 pm

Bob, thanks. Actually, sampling Boddington on handpump isn't easy. Most of it is sold on nitro dispense in England as here (the draft I mean). But I found it once in Manchester on handpump (cask-conditioned) in the big city center pubs. It was very good but again the canned and nitro versions are quite similar. Ruddles County is still available in the South on handpump, and is very good. The green can version was never a widget, it was (to its credit) always a plain carbonated beer. I am not a fan of the widget, to me it seems to dampen hop flavor and tends to lend a cream soda-like taste to beer. I don't mind it in stout though (Guinness and other). I remember that Burton-style beer from Southhampton, it was very good.

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