Beer lovers, a question.........

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Beer lovers, a question.........

Unread postby Mike » Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:07 am

Curiosity leads me to ask if any of our beer lovers on BE are familiar with Pale Ales that contain rye. The only one with which I am familiar is described below.

There is a brewery in Athens, Georgia called the Terrapin Beer Company. Their signature ale, called, appropriately enough, Terrapin Rye Pale Ale, contains rye as the name says.

This ale is quite highly hopped and the rye adds another touch of bite to it. This is a very good and refreshing beer and I try to always have it on hand. It is available on tap in some places in the Athens/Atlanta area, but they do not bottle the beer in Athens. They have it bottled under contract to a bottler in Fredrick MD.

Unfortunately, it is only distributed in an area within a few hundred miles of Athens, so won't be available to most of the BE audience. If you think you must absolutely have some email me and I will see what I can do.

It won the American Pale Ale Gold Medal at the 2002 Great American Beer Festival, so it has gotten some deserved recognition. As you have by now guessed, I like this beer a lot and was just wondering if there are other beers out there whose recipe includes rye.

http://www.terrapinbeer.com/
Do not go gentle into that good night,
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Rage, rage against the dying of the light. - Dylan Thomas
Mike
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Location: Conyers, GA

Pale ale ingredients...

Unread postby ShowMe » Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:36 am

Mike - I homebrewed for 10+ years, and quickly graduated to grinding and mashing malted grain rather than using the extracts. Brewed quite a few batches of Pale Ale, as it is fairly easy to make, has good body and good shelf life (usually drank it too quickly and didn't have to worry about this!). If I remember correctly, use of rye and oats (particularly oats) is rather chancy due to to the high amount of oil they contain. Of course this is relative to barley, rice and wheat.

The use of rye/oats can add interesting character and flavorings to ales. They are not typically used in lagers due to their lighter, cleaner character. Also the higher oil content adds instability to the ale - tends to decrease shelf life and make them prone to rancidness. Hence the use you mention in a heavier beer/ale. However it can be done - as evidenced by your fav ale. I'll keep my eye pealed for rye brews and drop you a note if I find one. I'm partial to IPA and Hefeweizen myself.

I haven't brewed in about 7 years - too many interests and too little time. A book by Charles Papazian used to be the bible on this subject. Look in the library for it and see what he has to say.

Mike
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Unread postby Mike » Sun Mar 12, 2006 8:26 pm

Showme Mike,

I too am a brewer............I have a batch in secondary fermentation right now. It is a Celebration Ale wanna be. It came in a 'partial grain' organic kit from an internet site. I have only done a full grain mashing once.........too much trouble for me and without the proper equipment, a bit risky. See the 'Pull My Finger Brewhaha' post below in this same forum.
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. - Dylan Thomas
Mike
Registered User
 
Posts: 2106
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 5:36 pm
Location: Conyers, GA


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