Stone from Abraham Keller Distillery for sale

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Stone from Abraham Keller Distillery for sale

Unread postby RobotAZ » Sat Oct 24, 2009 12:48 am

http://lexington.craigslist.org/mat/1421514017.html

Wow is all I can say. I wish I had a big house planned. That warehouse looks like the oldest I've ever seen.
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Re: Stone from Abraham Keller Distillery for sale

Unread postby cowdery » Sat Oct 24, 2009 5:09 pm

It looks very similar to the warehouses at Pepper/Woodford, which were built in something like 1880, and I suspect this place is from the same era, so it is almost certainly not "stone from 1840," not that it matters.

Several distilleries used native limestone for some of all of their buildings. Kentucky River (later Canada Dry) did, so did Stamping Ground. Generally, though, stone construction was not used. Kentucky distilleries tended to look rather thrown-together. One writer said they looked like sawmills.
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Re: Stone from Abraham Keller Distillery for sale

Unread postby RobotAZ » Sat Oct 24, 2009 7:58 pm

Well, you can buy the old slave walls from farmers all day long if you want it to be ancient, but the fact that it comes from a historic distillery is really cool in my opinion.
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Re: Stone from Abraham Keller Distillery for sale

Unread postby cowdery » Sat Oct 24, 2009 9:51 pm

No argument, I'm just saying that warehouse probably was built 40 or 50 years later than they're claiming.

One of my Kentucky friends is from a distilling family and, luckily, also a house-building family. Her father built her house entirely with lumber salvaged from her great-grandtather's distiillery, specifically from one of the warehouses. When they were framing it up you could still smell the whiskey in the wood, she says.
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