A Jigger of Common Sense

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Unread postby TNbourbon » Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:05 pm

On a tangential point, I've had a similar argument occasionally over my intermittent chase for late Stitzel-Weller products that can still be found on some shelves. Several times, people point out that even that which remains was made far after Pappy had left the business (and, for that matter, this world). In response, I point out that Ed Foote was still making the Stitzel-Weller whiskey from that all-copper still till the distillery closed, and THAT made it Stitzel-Weller, not the association with Pappy, however fortuitous that is.
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Unread postby Strayed » Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:53 pm

Yes Mike, and Andrew Carnegie sure could whip up an ingot or two of fine steel when he wanted to, too. 8)

There isn't any indication anywhere that Pappy Van Winkle had any involvement at all with the production side of his whiskey manufacturing business, other than his support of the folks who worked to fill the orders.

No, you didn't tell me about the strike in 1961 where the whole family, including Pappy, went to work distilling whiskey. I think that might be because it didn't happen. That was Julian II and King McClure, not the whole family. And they worked at bottling and distribution, i.e., contract fullfillment, not production. Pappy was 87 years old in 1961 and he wasn't even all that involved with the business anymore (he officially retired less than three years later).

Thomas Jefferson wasn't a great explorer. That was Clark & Lewis. But that doesn't detract from his importance as the president who authorized the mission. Pappy was great whiskey man, and it shouldn't be necessary to pretend his greatness was as a distiller.
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Unread postby cowdery » Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:34 am

Of all the "names we know" in association with distilleries, Jim Beam was probably one of that few who could actually make a batch. Pappy Van Winkle was primarily a salesman. He knew a lot about what went on in his facility because he was that kind of manager, but I doubt he really knew his way around a still or a yeast pot. I don't believe George Garvin Brown or any of his descendants actually made whiskey either. Again, salesmen. Likewise all of the Bills Samuel, and Colonel Blanton, and George T. Stagg, and E.H. Taylor. Salesmen, managers, financers, not distillers. Even many "master distillers" don't necessarily know how to run all the equipment. That's up to the plant managers and the actual operators. And Henry Ford didn't make all the cars either.
- Chuck Cowdery

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Unread postby bourbonv » Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:04 pm

I agree with what you are saying Chuck. I only disagree with John's statement that he "KNEW NOTHING about making whiskey". That is going too far. Pappy was a master salesman and manager for the distillery and even though he was not a production person, he was quite knowledgable about how to make whiskey. I respect John's opinion but sometimes he does get a little absurd to make a point and needs to be reminded just how absurd he gets.

John, I would disagree with you about the straike because there are photographs at U.D. showing them all, Pappy included, working to get the product out. This includes the full fermenters and such that were left by the Union Workers that walked out.

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Re: A Jigger of Common Sense

Unread postby bourbonv » Wed Dec 14, 2011 5:24 pm

Move up for the Derby Museum folk.
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