alberta premium

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alberta premium

Unread postby tmckenzie » Mon Jun 08, 2009 5:58 pm

I am still studying all of the variations of rye that I can get my hands on to compare to ours. I had a friend that was going into ontario for the weekend, pick up a bottle of alberta premium. Now, to hear Jim Murray talk it is liquid gold. It is tasty with a really good rye flavor, but it is a touch light for my taste. Has anyone else hear tried it?
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby cowdery » Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:28 pm

Even though Alberta Premium is supposed to be 100% rye, it's still a Canadian whiskey and not an American straight, so it's a very different animal and, yes, very light compared to any American straight rye.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby tmckenzie » Tue Jun 09, 2009 5:19 pm

I done some reading on it today. It seems that it is rye whiskey, blended with gns from rye. That is why it says on the label from 100 percent rye grain. I had a snort a little while ago, and it still ain't too bad. Probably the best canadian on the market, although that is not saying much.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby tmckenzie » Tue Jun 09, 2009 5:22 pm

I read the post on mellow corn, and I stand corrected. It is not gns from rye, but, barely whiskey from rye. :D
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby jaygats » Thu Sep 24, 2009 9:55 pm

Currently drinking alberta premium 25yr. If you ever have the chance to grab one of these, you must! This is the best bottles I've had under 50$ (30$ in Ontario). Really sweet cocoa with a hint of... honey?Lacks character at entry, granted (compared to the better bourbons I've had) but there's a slight bite followed by a seemingly never ending finish. Really enjoying this one. There's a flash of that candied apple that I loved in the PVW 23 too. Sorry I couldn't give a more detailed review, it's my first one!
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby cowdery » Thu Sep 24, 2009 11:58 pm

The base whiskey in Canadian blends is technically whiskey, not neutral spirit, though it is nearly neutral or, one might say, just barely whiskey. American blends use GNS. Canadian blends do not.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby p_elliott » Fri Sep 25, 2009 12:06 pm

cowdery wrote:The base whiskey in Canadian blends is technically whiskey, not neutral spirit, though it is nearly neutral or, one might say, just barely whiskey. American blends use GNS. Canadian blends do not.


Chuck

Could you explain further how could American blends be based on GNS where would they get their flavor?
Or am I not understanding your post? Canadian blends are blended with GNS. ? but are not based on them. Why do they the term blend or should they be using the term vat or vatting? They mean different things.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby p_elliott » Fri Sep 25, 2009 12:21 pm

No I got it thanks
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby cowdery » Sat Sep 26, 2009 12:44 am

Blended whiskey (AKA whiskey--a blend) is a mixture which contains straight whiskey or a blend of straight whiskeys at not less than 20 percent on a proof gallon basis, excluding alcohol derived from added harmless coloring, flavoring or blending materials, and, separately, or in combination, whiskey or neutral spirits.

Since the final product will typically be 80 proof, more than 20% of the contents will be straight whiskey. Some blends are as much as 40% straight whiskey. The rest of the volume may be neutral spirits and usually is.

Canadian blends, like Scottish blends, start with a base of nearly neutral whiskey. It is grain spirit distilled out at just below 90 percent alcohol, so it is not considered neutral (95% is considered neutral). It is then aged for at least three years in used barrels, typically first refill bourbon barrels. That is blended with multiple flavoring whiskeys, single malts in the case of Scotland. Canada doesn't sell any of its "straight" whiskey, it's only used for flavoring.

The only additive scotch allows is spirit caramel, which supposedly is only for color and is neutral in flavor, but everyone knows it also adds a little sweetness and caramel flavor. American and Canadian blends can use pretty much anything they want as coloring and flavoring, but they aren't using some kind of flavor house 'whiskey essence.' They may add a little of this and that.

Canadian whiskey may contain up to 9% bourbon, brandy, rum, scotch, or any other spirit.

In the USA, they use neutral spirits which they may "age" for three months or so in used wood. As a practical matter, the Canadian and Scottish base whiskeys aren't much more flavorful than the American neutral spirits, but they are technically whiskey. In all three cases (American, Canadian, Scottish) most of the flavor comes from the low proof, well-aged flavorings whiskeys that are the lower part of the volume.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby Shell@freilich.com » Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:13 pm

tmckenzie wrote:I am still studying all of the variations of rye that I can get my hands on to compare to ours. I had a friend that was going into ontario for the weekend, pick up a bottle of alberta premium. Now, to hear Jim Murray talk it is liquid gold. It is tasty with a really good rye flavor, but it is a touch light for my taste. Has anyone else hear tried it?


I am also a big rye fan with the goal of trying the range of rye whiskeys (and, of course, adding favorites to my collection). Alberta Premium is (one of the few) Canadian whiskies that uses 100% rye. (The others that I have come across, but have not sampled: Hirsch Selection Canadian Rye - I think is 100% rye. Whistle Pig 10 yr. Straight Rye is produced in Canada and bottled in Vermont - with mazing review on this one.)

The Alberta Premium 5 year is only available in Canada. I bought a bottle: It is a very nice mixing whiskey and quite economical. I don't prefer it for straight sipping, though.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby Shell@freilich.com » Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:23 pm

jaygats wrote:Currently drinking alberta premium 25yr. If you ever have the chance to grab one of these, you must! This is the best bottles I've had under 50$ (30$ in Ontario). Really sweet cocoa with a hint of... honey?Lacks character at entry, granted (compared to the better bourbons I've had) but there's a slight bite followed by a seemingly never ending finish. Really enjoying this one. There's a flash of that candied apple that I loved in the PVW 23 too. Sorry I couldn't give a more detailed review, it's my first one!


Nice tasting notes on the Alberta Premium 25 year. I have been searching high and low for it since August 2010, without luck. Unfortunately, Alberta Distillers in Calgary, Alberta stopped distributing it in Feb. 2010. The Ontario LCBO (provincial liquor store) folks had been selling it for CN$30, & told me that the last available bottles were bought up by Americans taking back 2 cases at a time. I found a few bottle left in a Calgary liquor store, but the price had climbed to CN $58 (before sales tax, & any shipping costs would be additional)!

Alberta Premium is coming out with a 30 year sometime in 2011, but it won't be priced as low as the 25 year old.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby Shell » Fri Aug 05, 2011 11:28 am

I just bought a bottle of Alberta Premium 30 yr. Limited Edition 100% Rye Whisky. According to the box, Alberta Premium only produced 700 cases for release. It sells for CN$ 49.95. (It is only sold in Canadian liquor stores. The store I was in only had 3 bottles left.)

It is a truly outstanding, complex whisky. The rye grain unleashes a range of flavors as it lingers in the mouth. While the rye tones are not as bold as many American straight ryes, they remind me of the rye tones in the Sazerac Rye (no age statement), but significantly more depth.

It is a wonderful addition to my collection of ryes.
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Re: alberta premium

Unread postby VaderTime » Wed Aug 10, 2011 8:23 am

cowdery wrote:Blended whiskey (AKA whiskey--a blend) is a mixture which contains straight whiskey or a blend of straight whiskeys at not less than 20 percent on a proof gallon basis, excluding alcohol derived from added harmless coloring, flavoring or blending materials, and, separately, or in combination, whiskey or neutral spirits.

Since the final product will typically be 80 proof, more than 20% of the contents will be straight whiskey. Some blends are as much as 40% straight whiskey. The rest of the volume may be neutral spirits and usually is.

Canadian blends, like Scottish blends, start with a base of nearly neutral whiskey. It is grain spirit distilled out at just below 90 percent alcohol, so it is not considered neutral (95% is considered neutral). It is then aged for at least three years in used barrels, typically first refill bourbon barrels. That is blended with multiple flavoring whiskeys, single malts in the case of Scotland. Canada doesn't sell any of its "straight" whiskey, it's only used for flavoring.

The only additive scotch allows is spirit caramel, which supposedly is only for color and is neutral in flavor, but everyone knows it also adds a little sweetness and caramel flavor. American and Canadian blends can use pretty much anything they want as coloring and flavoring, but they aren't using some kind of flavor house 'whiskey essence.' They may add a little of this and that.

Canadian whiskey may contain up to 9% bourbon, brandy, rum, scotch, or any other spirit.

In the USA, they use neutral spirits which they may "age" for three months or so in used wood. As a practical matter, the Canadian and Scottish base whiskeys aren't much more flavorful than the American neutral spirits, but they are technically whiskey. In all three cases (American, Canadian, Scottish) most of the flavor comes from the low proof, well-aged flavorings whiskeys that are the lower part of the volume.


Just excellent information! I think I might have to spring for the ebook after all!

Cheers
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